Astromaterials 3D: An Interactive Virtual Library of NASA’s Apollo Lunar & Antarctic Meteorite Samples

Erika Blumenfeld, NASA, USA
Erika Blumenfeld is an independent transdisciplinary artist working at the intersection of art, science, nature and culture. Her research-based art practice is motivated by the wonder of natural phenomena and she often works in collaboration with scientists and research institutions, including NASA,...
Erika Blumenfeld is an independent transdisciplinary artist working at the intersection of art, science, nature and culture. Her research-based art practice is motivated by the wonder of natural phenomena and she often works in collaboration with scientists and research institutions, including NASA, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the McDonald Observatory, and the South African National Antarctic Program. Blumenfeld is a Guggenheim Fellow, a Smithsonian Artist Research Fellow, and has exhibited widely in museums and galleries in the U.S. and abroad. Blumenfeld is artist-in-residence and Science-Principal Investigator on the Astromaterials 3D project at ARES where she is leading a team to create a 3D virtual library of NASA's astromaterials collections to bring high-resolution research-grade 3D models to researchers and the public. Blumenfeld conceived the project in 2013, and she and the Astromaterials 3D team won a NASA ROSES PDART grant in 2015 to pursue the project. The Astromaterials 3D project launched to the public in December 2020 and will continue to roll out new samples ongoing.

Contrast Imaging and 3D Muscle Modeling in Vertebrate Cranial Biomechanics and Evolution

Dr Casey Holliday, University of Missouri, USA
Casey Holliday is an Associate Professor of Anatomy in the Integrative Anatomy Program at the University of Missouri School of Medicine. His lab uses comparative anatomy, imaging and biomechanics to explore how the heads of living and extinct vertebrates are built, how they work and how they’ve ev...
Casey Holliday is an Associate Professor of Anatomy in the Integrative Anatomy Program at the University of Missouri School of Medicine. His lab uses comparative anatomy, imaging and biomechanics to explore how the heads of living and extinct vertebrates are built, how they work and how they’ve evolved. This work cuts across fields of human and veterinary medicine, paleontology and musculoskeletal biomechanics and has made discoveries that range from how pangolin tongues work to how stiff the skull of Tyrannosaurus was. Casey received his PhD from Ohio University (2006) and BS in Zoology from the University of Florida (1997) and is an active member of the Society for Comparative and Integrative Biology, American Association for Anatomists and the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology.

Mission Impossible: Imaging Biofilms with X-rays

Dr Dorthe Wildenschild, Oregon State University, USA
Dorthe Wildenschild (M.S and PhD. Danish Technical University) is a professor of environmental engineering in the School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University. Her research focuses on flow and transport in porous media, addressing research questions related...
Dorthe Wildenschild (M.S and PhD. Danish Technical University) is a professor of environmental engineering in the School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University. Her research focuses on flow and transport in porous media, addressing research questions related to subsurface water pollution and energy-related storage. Recent work includes the optimization of geologic storage of anthropogenic CO2 in subsurface reservoirs; exploration of colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants in groundwater; microbial enhanced oil recovery and biofilm growth in porous media; and investigations in support of more effective groundwater remediation techniques. She currently runs an NSF-funded microtomography user facility at Oregon State.

Phase Tomography based on X-ray Wave Nature: Past and Future

Dr Atsushi Momose, Tohoku University, Japan
Prof. Atsushi Momose is a full professor in the Institute of Multidisciplinary Research of Tohoku University, Japan and also a research director of the ERATO project with the Japan Science and Technology Agency (until March, 2021). When he was with the Advanced Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., he...
Prof. Atsushi Momose is a full professor in the Institute of Multidisciplinary Research of Tohoku University, Japan and also a research director of the ERATO project with the Japan Science and Technology Agency (until March, 2021). When he was with the Advanced Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., he gained the idea of X-ray phase tomography at the beginning of the 1990s and demonstrated the world’s first X-ray phase tomography by observing non-stained cancerous tissues using synchrotron radiation. Furthermore, he developed X-ray phase imaging/tomography systems with laboratory-based X-ray tubes later. Its applications to clinical diagnosis and non-destructive testing are in progress. He has authored over 160 peer-reviewed papers (h-index of 34) and won Optics and Quantum Electronics Achievement Award (The Japan Society of Applied Physics, 2021), Commendation for Science and Technology by the Minister of MEXT (2020), Nakatani Foundation Award (2013), Toyama Award (2008), and so on for his achievements in X-ray phase imaging development.

Using Computed Tomography Scanning to Understand Functional Morphology of the Trap-jaw Spider Predatory Strike

Dr Hannah Wood, National Museum of Natural History (Smithsonian), USA
Hannah Wood has been a Research Scientist and Curator at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution since 2015. Prior to this position, she had two postdoctoral fellowships: she was an NSF Postdoctoral Fellow at the Advance Light Source Synchrotron, Lawrence Berkeley National La...
Hannah Wood has been a Research Scientist and Curator at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution since 2015. Prior to this position, she had two postdoctoral fellowships: she was an NSF Postdoctoral Fellow at the Advance Light Source Synchrotron, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, and the University of California, Davis, and a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Zoological Museum, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. She received her PhD from the University of California at Berkeley in 2011. Her research uses computed tomography scanning to understand evolution and functional morphology of spider “jaws”.

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